What happens now to JPE et al?


Now that the Ombudsman has found probable cause against three senators, Janet Napoles and Dennis Cunanan for plunder and violations of the anti-graft law, what happens next? Will they immediately be put behind bars and tried in the same manner that former President Erap Estrada was?

Not quite.

All indicted accused have the statutory right to move for reconsideration on the finding of probable cause. There is probable cause when on the basis of the evidence, the Prosecutor or the Ombudsman concludes that there is likelihood that a crime was committed and that the respondents are probably liable for these crimes. It’s a very low standard because ultimately, the determination of guilt beyond reasonable doubt is a judicial function. Nonetheless, when the indictment is for a capital offense where bail is not a matter of right when the evidence of the accused is strong, a finding of probable cause is almost always a guarantee of the temporary deprivation of the right to liberty.

So, because of their right to move for reconsideration, no information is immediately forthcoming. Consequently, there will also be no warrant of arrest that will be issued soon.

I was correct in my assessment that the finding itself of probable cause will be marred with delay. The Ombudsman resolution came eight months after newspaper reported the details of the scam. This is still relatively quick given that the Ombudsman, unlike the regular Prosecutors, do not comply with the requirement that they conclude their preliminary investigations on or before 90 days from submission of the case. Clearly, it was the public indignation of the PDAF scam that compelled the Ombudsman to act more quickly than usual.

Outside of the motion for reconsideration, the accused may also proceed to the Court of Appeals to challenge the determination of probable cause. Although this is no longer a statutory right, it is nonetheless a constitutional right since the 1987 Constitution provides that judicial power includes the power to annul acts of government which are done in utter grave abuse of discretion amounting to lack of or in excess of jurisdiction. There is grave abuse of discretion where there is a violation of the Constitution or any existing law. Already, Senator Bong Revilla has a pending petition describing the Ombudsman’s refusal to act on his complaints against Luy et al as acts indicating grave abuse of discretion The Supreme Court has already scheduled his petition for oral arguments.

It is only after the resolution of the motion for reconsideration and if the higher courts do not restrain the Ombudsman that the information is filed with the Sandiganbayan. Unless the information is filed, the special anti-graft court cannot issue warrants of arrest.

Is it for certain that the accused will be apprehended and detained?

Yes, insofar as their actual arrest is the manner by which the Court can acquire jurisdiction over their persons. Fortunately for the respondents, they can now invoke the new rules of the Supreme Court on the speedy grant of bail to secure provisional release even for capital offenses. Under A.M. No. 12-11-2- or the SC “GUIDELINES FOR DECONGESTING HOLDING JAILS BY ENFORCING THE RIGHTS OF ACCUSED PERSONS TO BAIL AND TO SPEEDY TRIAL”, the respondents, when they are charged in court can file a petition for bail. The procedure now is on the basis of affidavits or direct testimonies, the prosecutor has the burden to prove that the evidence of guilt is strong. Thereafter the Judge, including the Sandiganbayan, only has 48 hours to summarize the evidence presented and determine whether or not the evidence of guilt is strong. If so, the accused will be denied bail. Otherwise, he will be allowed to post bail to secure his provisional liberty.

This new guidelines is long delayed. The predisposition of Courts is to allow the prosecution to prove that the evidence of guilt is strong in a manner that would reproduce the evidence presented for bail as evidence on the merits. In this manner, the accused is for all intents and purposes, denied the right to bail because the determination of guilt is made part and parcel of the presentation of the evidence on the merits.

Senator Juan Ponce Enrile as an octogenarian will probably be given special consideration given his age. So will the two incumbent senators. While pickpockets and others committing petty crimes have to endure torturous conditions in our local jails, the three senators, because of precedents—will inevitably detained in special detention facilities. Already, Janet Lim Napoles is on hospital arrest. I foresee that Enrile and the two other senators may also seek hospital or house arrest. Note that being an octogenarian will not exempt Enrile from criminal prosecution or from being arrested. This is how the Sandiganbayan can acquire jurisdiction over his person. But when he is convicted, the Sandiganbayan has the option of recommending his release on humanitarian grounds.

What happens to Ruby Tuason and Cunanan? To begin with, I’m surprised that they were even indicted. Under the Witness Protection Law, those admitted into the program should not be included in the charge sheet. Perhaps the Ombudsman will later move that they be dropped. Otherwise, it could already be an indication that the Ombudsman does not consider their testimonies to be indispensable in proving the averments in the Information. Personally, I hope this is in fact the case. Let Tuason be the queen of socialites in jail.

 

(View from Malcolm, Manila Standard Today, 4 April 2014)

 

 

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One comment on “What happens now to JPE et al?

  1. Rizalde F Laudencia says:

    The petition to question the finding of probable cause in the criminal case should be filed with the Supreme Court. In administrative cases, the appeal from decisions of the Office of the Ombudsman is to the Court of Appeals.

    “It is the nature of the case that determines the proper remedy to be filed and the appellate court where such remedy should be filed by a party aggrieved by the decisions or orders of the Office of the Ombudsman. If it is an administrative case, appeal should be taken to the Court of Appeals under Rule 43 of the Rules of Court. If it is a criminal case, the proper remedy is to file with the Supreme Court an original petition for certiorari under Rule 65.” (Amado Perez, et al. v. Office of the Ombudsman, et al., G.R. No. 131445, May 27, 2004, citing Fabian vs. Ombudsman Desierto, 295 SCRA 470 [1998]; and Kuizon vs. Ombudsman Desierto, 354 SCRA 158 [2001]; Mendoza-Arce vs. Ombudsman, 380 SCRA 325 [2002].

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