Pigs all


Now it can be told: they were all pigs.

While Malacanang may have intended its witch-hunt to be limited to the political opposition with the recent cases field against Tanda, Pogi and Sexy, the dangerous maneuver has since boomeranged and the pig stench now goes all the way to Malacanang.

We now know that Napoles did not just deal with three senators. She dealt with no less than 25 of them. This is why the only senator who is undoubtedly untarnished by the pork barrel scandal, Ping Lacson, said that the latest Napoles list may bring down the Senate as an institution.

In fairness to those whose names appeared in the list, their guilt still has to be proven in a court of law. All of them, including the initial targets of Malacanang, are all entitled to presumption of innocence. This applies even to DBM Secretary Butch Abad, probably among the closest to PNoy, and even to the Umali siblings, one of whom, the incumbent governor of Mindoro, is known to be among the BFFs of the President. But the cat is now out of the bag. While they all enjoy due process rights, they all now have to answer to the court of public opinion. Ultimately, Malacanang is the biggest loser in this latest expose. For while the Palace billed itself as the persecutor of the corrupt in high and mighty places, such as the Senate, it now has to account for the fact that the dung is now in its front porch. Talk of karma.

Lest we think that only those who appeared in list should explain themselves to the public, the reality is that list only enumerates senatongs and tongressmen who allegedly benefitted from the Napoles style of funneling pubic funds to bogus NGOs. It is not an authoritative list of legislators who personally benefitted from their pork. Ten billion pesos, after all, is a very small amount relative to the total expenditure for PDAF over the years. What still have to be accounted for are the kickbacks, anywhere from a low of 10 percent to a high of 60 percent, in the cost of infrastructure projects. Already, we have heard how a southern contractor, also said to be fronting for the former FG, has cornered the infrastructure allocations from his region and even of sitting and past senators. When will we begin the inquiry on this? Ten billion is an anthill compared to the amount of money funneled to this southern contractor.

The truth is that every legislator who accepted and used his or her pork stinks. Those not in the lists are not in the limelight but are dirty nonetheless. Another stinking truth is that legislators bought their seats in Congress expecting to make a net profit from their pork barrel allocations. This explains why we have a Congress with virtually no cerebral capacity.

But the blame should not be on the corrupt legislators alone. It is the people, after all, who sold their votes to these thieves for a song! Had they voted on the basis of qualification and integrity of those who stood for public office, we would have had quality policies and not the crap that we have right now. And it is precisely because their votes had to be bought that politicians systematically made money out of their pork.

Furthermore, let us not deceive ourselves into thinking that the problem is only in the Legislature. The President has the biggest pork! It’s in the national budget, in Pagcor, and in PCSO. Presidential aspirants, PNoy included, spent no less than P2 billion to join the presidential fray. How do you think a sitting President will recoup his cost? Part of it will come from his pork, although a large part of it will be repaid in dole to campaign contributors.

And yes, even the Judiciary has its own pork, the Judicial Development Fund. Until today, this has not been subjected to full audit.

Was I therefore surprised, or even excited by Ping’s revelation of the names in the list? Certainly not. I know in my heart and mind that all those who accepted pork are corrupt. There is nothing new therefore in the revelation. But what is new is the fact that unlike in the past when the public appeared complacent to systemic thievery, as in fact tongpats has been referred to as “standard operating procedure”, the public now appears enraged.

Some good will hopefully result in this latest telenovela. For instance, it is hoped that with national elections barely two years away, the recent developments will result in the public electing individuals who have the competence and the skills to run both the executive and legislative branches of government. Hopefully, those who have been convicted in the court of public opinion will be meted the penalty of defeat in 2016. This may actually pave the way for those who have not stolen, and will not steal from the public coffers to have the opportunity to render genuine pubic service. Moreover, the public, hopefully, will also be educated that they will have the same rotten leadership if they continue to sell their votes.

The pigsty stinks. Some good will come from  dung—but it wil only come after the process of composting. Let’s hope this is the ending to this zarzuela.

35

The one hundred and second


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Good news to the families of the 58 victims of the infamous Maguindanao massacre. Shortly after the 1000th day anniversary of the massacre, Datu Ulo Ampatuan, brother of recently arrested and injured Ipeh Ampatuan, son of Anwar Ampatuan, grandson of Andal Ampatuan Sr, became the 102nd suspect to finally be apprehended for the massacre by the Philippine National Police.

This means that there are now 94 suspects who still have to be arrested. Without doubt, this is a very small step in the uphill battle for justice to the victims of the massacre, but good news nonetheless. What is worrisome is the pronouncement of his lawyer that 1000 days after the massacre, Ulo Ampatuan never went into hiding as in fact, he was arrested not in the jungles of Maguindanao, but in BF Resort in Las Pinas. Does this mean that all these time, the PNP was not actively seeking him out to be arrested? If so, this may mean that it would take 10 lifetimes before all of the suspects are finally arrested.

Just last week, I wrote about what next to do after we ratified the Rome Statute. Part of what is now incumbent upon us is the duty to cooperate particularly in the arrest of individuals who are subjects of warrants of arrest issued by the International Criminal Court. I have always maintained that the arrest of these persons may be our waterloo since obviously, our PNP has not proven to be effective in apprehending individuals with warrants of arrest. Aside from those still at large in the Maguindanao case, there are also the Reyes siblings of Palawan, both wanted for the murder of Doc Gerry Ortega; Joselito Binayug, wanted for the Darius Evangelista murder; former Rep. Ruben Ecleo, and Jovito Palparan. Unless the PNP shapes up, we may become the laughingstock of the international community since in almost all civilized societies, the apprehension of wanted individuals is considered to be amongst the most basis function of a police force.

This leads me now to the search for the new DILG Secretary. The DILG, by law, has supervision over both local government units and the PNP. Supervision is legally defined as the duty to ensure that hat local government units and the PNP are performing their functions. But because LGU heads have popular mandates, the thrust of the DILG really is over the PNP. It is clear that whoever will take-over the post must primarily have the ability to reign in a police force that has proven to be both inept and inefficient. This is why many of us regular citizens would like to see the likes of Senator Panfilo Lacson at the helm of the Department. Yes, the man may not be perfect- as who can claim to be perfect anyway? But there should be no doubt that Lacson, with his experience and proven abilities, can rebuild the PNP into what the law envisions it to be: the implementer and not the breaker of the law.